Prevent Damage

How do you know if you are damaging your hearing? Often it is everyday noise that will catch up with us. Especially if the work or activities you are doing everyday expose you to sounds higher than 85 decibels. How do you know if what you are exposed to is higher than these levels? Here is a guide to every day sounds and exposure levels that can be harmful to your hearing over time:

Everyday Sound and Noises
Intensity (dB)
Response
Firecrackers
140-150
Pain and ear injury
Standing beside or near sirens
120
Pain and ear injury
Shouting or barking in the ear
110
Damage and hearing loss is possible in less than 2 minutes
The maximum volume level for personal listening devices; a very loud radio, stereo, or television; and loud entertainment venues (such as nightclubs, bars, and rock concerts)
105-110
Damage to hearing is possible in less than 5 minutes of exposure
Approaching subway train, car horn at 16 feet (5 meters), and sporting events (such as hockey playoffs and football games)
100
Damage to hearing is possible after 15 minutes of exposure
Motorcycle
95
Damage to hearing is possible after 50 minutes of exposure
Gas-powered lawnmowers and leaf blowers
80-85
Damage to hearing is possible after 2 hours of exposure
City traffic (inside the car)
80-85
You may feel very annoyed by the noise
Washing machine, dishwasher
70
You may feel annoyed by the noise
Normal conversation, air conditioner
60
Typically do not cause hearing damage
Refrigerator hum
40
Typically do not cause hearing damage
Soft whisper
30
Typically do not cause hearing damage
Ticking watch
20
Typically do not cause hearing damage
Normal breathing
10
Typically do not cause hearing damage
Softest sound that can be heard
0
Hearing test showing ear of young woman

Prevent Hearing Loss